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Corn Callus

A Corn Callus is an area of hard, thickened skin on the foot that is formed in response to pressure or friction. They are part of the body’s defense system to protect the underlying tissues. If the cause of pressure is not relieved, calluses can become painful. If pressure becomes concentrated in a small area, a ‘hard’ corn may develop. A corn has a central core.

Common sites of corn and callus formation are the ball of the foot, under the big toe, the tips and the tops of toes. ‘Soft’ corns may develop between the toes, where the skin is moist from sweat or inadequate drying. Sometimes, the pressure of the corn or callus may produce inflammation, which can result in acute pain, swelling and redness.

Corns and calluses may be a sign that you have an underlying foot disorder, such as a joint that is out of alignment. This is why it is important to seek professional advice rather than attempt to treat calluses or corns yourself.

Symptoms
The symptoms of corns and calluses can include:

  • Thickened patch of hard skin on the foot.
  • Hard, small bump of skin that may have a central core.
  • White and rubbery bumps of skin (‘soft’ corns, in between the toes).
  • In some cases, the callus pushes into the foot, rather than spreading across the skin surface.
  • Pain when pressure or friction is applied to the area.

 

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